POWERPLAY

JOINT RELIEF AND MUSCLE RECOVERY

     No other compression and cold therapy system tops the convenience, value and flexibility of PowerPlay.

    At approximately one pound, PowerPlay is convenient for travel or home use–and with three ports that each offer cold and intermittent, sequential compression for joints and muscle relief, PowerPlay gives you more therapy options. Our products combine the benefits of both cold therapy and compression therapy to get you optimized results.

Cold Therapy

Cold therapy has been shown to be effective in decreasing pain, muscle spasms, and swelling in injured or overworked joints and muscles.
PowerPlay takes these benefits further by adding active compression therapy to:

* Mimic the body’s natural muscle contractions,
* Pump edema out of the injured area,
* Stimulate tissue healing
* Increase blood flow and delivery of oxygen to the site
* And optimize lymphatic drainage.

BENEFITS:

** Travels conveniently between sporting events and home
** Compression therapy and cold therapy Aid in RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) anywhere with no mess
** Provides the flexibility for multiple joint or muscle therapy for up to three athletes
** Accelerates the removal of lactic acid following high-intensity exercise
** Reduces severity and duration of exercise—induced muscle injury and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS)
** Improves circulation to reduce swelling, soreness and fatigue
** Provides cold therapy and compression therapy in one convenient solution and without worry about pressure or temperature extreme

LEARN ABOUT RESTLESS LEG SYNDROME

AND COMPRESSION THERAPY

Restless Leg Syndrome (also referred to as RLS and Willis-Ekbom disease) is a fairly common and uncomfortable disorder that causes an urge to move or massage the legs (or sometimes arms) while at rest. The sensations can differ from person to person, but Restless Leg Syndrome symptoms are often described as:

* “ants crawling on the legs”
* “pins and needles”
* “an itch you cannot scratch”
* achy legs
* twitching in the legs
* burning
* throbbing
* pulling sensations
* numbness

These symptoms often occur or get worse when the body is at rest – most likely in the evening, making it difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep. It is estimated that 10% of the population suffers from this condition, most of whom are women.

So the nagging question is: how is this troublesome condition relieved? Some prescription medications have been used to treat RLS, however they can cause unfavorable or sometimes intolerable side effects. Patients seeking a safe and non-pharmacological therapy should consider a pneumatic compression device (also referred to as a PCD), a compression machine that pumps air into sleeves worn around the legs. The sleeves compress and release to mimic ambulation (walking or moving around) when one is at rest.

PCDs have been clinically proven to alleviate Restless Leg Syndrome discomfort and in some cases, resolve the disorder completely. One study noted that the use of the compression therapy system resulted in a reduction of RLS symptoms in 90% of patients. Typically, patients wear the compression sleeves for an hour before bed, and sometimes while going to sleep if desired.

Pneumatic Compression Devices are also used in hospitals to prevent DVT (Deep Vein Thrombosis), and most are large, bulky and expensive. The PowerPlay Leg Massager Kit is a portable system that is lightweight, easy to use and cost-effective. It provides the same compression therapy as the aforementioned medical devices, and its portability makes it easier to use more frequently.

So why do compression therapy devices help ease the symptoms of Restless Leg Syndrome? There are a variety of theories as to why PCDs provide such relief, including enhanced lymphatic flow, removal of fluids that cause the symptoms from the lower legs, increased blood flow and improved venous drainage. Whatever the cause, it is clear that these calf compression devices are doing the job for most RLS sufferers.

Learn more about the PowerPlay Calf Massager Kit here (http://powerplay.us/product/calf-massager-kit/) .
Contraindications: Do not use the PowerPlay Calf Massager if you have a DVT (Deep Vein Thrombosis, or blood clot in the lower leg).

POWERPLAY CALF MASSAGE KIT

  • “I have suffered from restless leg syndrome for many years and the PowerPlay calf massage system is the only thing that has made a difference. I use it in the evening or when I am not active and it instantly relieves my RLS discomfort.”

    “I have suffered from restless leg syndrome for many years and the PowerPlay calf massage system is the only thing that has made a difference. I use it in the evening or when I am not active and it instantly relieves my RLS discomfort.”

    Sandy C.

    customer
  • “I use the PowerPlay calf massage wraps every night before bed for my RLS. My symptoms have dramatically decreased and I am able to sleep better than ever.”

    “I use the PowerPlay calf massage wraps every night before bed for my RLS. My symptoms have dramatically decreased and I am able to sleep better than ever.”

    Allison F

    customer
  • “The leg wraps really help me with restless legs. I have been trying all kinds of remedies, but this is the only thing that works every time.”

    “The leg wraps really help me with restless legs. I have been trying all kinds of remedies, but this is the only thing that works every time.”

    Ted H

    customer

ACL SURGERY RECOVERY

One of the most common yet most troublesome injuries in sports is an ACL injury (or Anterior Cruciate Ligament injury). An ACL injury is a tear in one of the knee ligaments that joins the upper leg bone (femur) with the lower leg bone (tibia) which keeps the knee stable. ACL tears in sports can happen for a number of reasons including changing direction too rapidly, stopping suddenly, a faulty landing from a jump or colliding with another athlete. This usually (and unfortunately) results in a season-ending injury for most athletes.

Although some people are able to recover from an ACL tear without surgery with proper care from a Physical Therapist, most athletes opt for ACL surgery, which can get them back on their feet faster. Most orthopedic surgeons opt for arthroscopic surgery as opposed to open surgery because it uses smaller incisions and poses less risk to the patient. Arthroscopic surgery is usually done on an outpatient basis, which means you do not need to spend the night in a hospital unless otherwise recommended by the surgeon.

ACL surgery recovery timelines vary from patient to patient, however it usually takes between 6 and 9 months to fully recover. While rehabilitating from ACL surgery, patients can use several methods to help speed their recovery process and get them back in the game sooner.

If you are planning for ACL surgery or have recently had surgery, it is important that you first consult your Physical Therapist who will guide you through the ACL surgery recovery process. He or she will give you range of motion routines and strengthening exercises at the right times in your rehabilitation.

It is very important to control pain and swelling immediately after surgery. Your orthopedic surgeon will probably recommend cold therapy immediately following surgery. Cold therapy helps reduce pain and swelling, which plays a major role in ACL surgery recovery. Once cleared by your doctor to do so, it is highly effective to add compression therapy to your cold therapy, which helps reduce swelling.

R.I.C.E. therapy

Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation

Cold and compression are key ingredients of R.I.C.E. therapy – Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation. Using a cryotherapy device with active or intermittent compression such as PowerPlay (https://powerplay.us/about/) during ACL surgery recovery can help ease pain and reduce inflammation. Intermittent compression works by pumping blood and oxygen up and out of the injury site. In addition to your cold compression therapy, resting and keeping your leg elevated will also aid in this process.

Your Physical Therapist will tell you when it is safe to start gentle exercise. He or she will recommend certain strengthening exercises to incorporate into your daily routine. You can expect a variety of range of motion exercises to get your mobility back to what it was prior to your ACL injury. Your PT will also recommend a series of stretches to continue at home. The types of recommended exercises will increase in activity level as time goes on, however you must be careful to not do too much too soon.

Eventually you will be able to ease into more intense exercises when your physician and PT clear you to do so. Swimming and cycling, for example, are great ways to increase your stamina, coordination and balance gradually, while being careful to not aggravate your knee or re-injure yourself. You should no longer feel pain and the circumference of your injured knee should match the circumference of your non-injured knee. Once you have been cleared to return to your sport, continuing your cold and compression therapy is beneficial in keeping swelling down and maintaining your performance.